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Patients asked to bring medicines into hospital 

East Kent Hospital is encouraging patients to bring their own medicines in to hospital when they arrive as an in-patient.

The NHS spends more than £15 billion on medicines every year – with hospitals accounting for £6 billion of that figure.

Pharmacy Operations Manager, Audra Chantry, said: “On average, the East Kent Hospitals sites tend to admit 556 patients to hospital every day of the year – and many of these patients will have multiple long-term health conditions.

“That means they’ll probably be taking regular medicine on a regular basis – and may have been doing so for some time.  But on being admitted to hospital, many patients or their carers don’t realise how important it is to bring their own medicines with them.”

But by bringing their own medicines into hospital, patients can help themselves, and also help the NHS to save much-needed money. 

Audra added: “Bringing medicines into hospital helps the medical staff to know exactly what medication a patient is taking at home – and assess whether all medication is being taken in the way it should be.  

There are also other advantages if patients bring their medicines into hospital patients help to cut down on waste. When a patient is discharged, they should be given enough medicine but not given more than they need.

Patients can continue to take the medicine that they’re used to at home, without any breaks in the treatment. Bringing medicines into hospital also helps to speed-up a patient’s discharge. 

“Money saved from medicines waste can be spent on other, high-cost services such as cancer treatments,” said Audra. “For example, if the Trust needs to re-supply an inhaler which you have at home, it can cost up to £90.

“So all in all, patients can help the NHS – and help themselves – by taking the simple step bringing their own medicine into hospital.” 

Money saved from medicines waste can be spent on other, high-cost services such as cancer treatments
Audra Chantry, Pharmacy Operations Manager

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