Skip to content

Website areas

Patients and visitors navigation

Our hospitals:

.

Having an MRI scan

Some patients can be anxious when invited for an MRI scan. 

Because of these concerns we've made this film to help you understand what having an MRI scan is all about. We'll show you what happens and introduce you to some of our patients who will tell you about their experiences.


When you arrive

Kent and Canterbury Hospital

Please report to the reception desk in the MRI unit upon arrival. This is situated in the CT and MRI building, located to the left of the Emergency Care Centre. You will be shown where to wait and staff in the MRI department will be informed of your arrival. Should there be any delays, the Receptionist will ensure that you are kept informed.

William Harvey Hospital

Please report to the reception desk in the CT / MRI unit upon arrival. This is situated in the CT and MRI building, located behind the Accident and Emergency department. You will be shown where to wait and staff in the MRI department will be informed of your arrival. Should there be any delays, the Receptionist will ensure that you are kept informed.

Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother Hospital

Please report to the main reception desk at the Radiology department upon arrival, this is situated at the Ramsgate Road entrance. You will be shown where to wait and staff in the MRI department will be informed of your arrival. Should there be any delays, the Receptionist will ensure that you are kept informed.

What is an MRI scan?

MRI stands for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, which uses a very strong magnet, radio frequency waves and a sophisticated computer, to produce detailed images not available from conventional x-rays.

How does an MRI scanner work? 

MRI is a non invasive technique which does not use x-rays. The majority of your body is made up of hydrogen protons. These normally spin at random, much like a spinning top. When placed into a Magnetic field the hydrogen protons align and spin in the same direction. A radio frequency pulse is passed through the body, which transfers some of its energy to the hydrogen protons. This is the Resonance bit. When the radio wave is turned off, the hydrogen protons relax and give back the energy that they absorbed, in the form of a radio wave. The signal is picked up by special aerials called coils and sent to a computer for processing. The computer converts the radio signals into pictures which are displayed on the computer screen. The Imaging produced forms ‘slices’ of the area being examined. 

Please take a look at the MRI Scan patient information leaflet for lots of useful information

Important safety information

You will not be able to have an MRI scan if you have any of the following:

  • Pacemaker

  • Surgical clips within your head

  • Metallic heart valve/s

  • Metal fragments within your eyes

  • Neuro electrical implants

  • Within the first three months of pregnancy.

Where can I get more information?

Useful websites

You may also contact the MRI scan teams on:

  • Kent and Canterbury Hospital: 01227 783084

  • William Harvey Hospital: 01233 633331 ext 723-8996

  • Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother Hospital: 01843 230699.

Section navigation

Footer navigation

Website areas

Copyright information